Savannah Cat Breed Information and Maintenance

by Souvik Ghosh

The exotic Savannah Cat breed has long legs, a graceful neck, and tall ears. It is elegant and lean. Together, these characteristics give the cat the appearance of being large, but most Savannahs are the same size as any other large domestic cat. Similar to the Serval (a species of tiger forest cat), from which it is descended, its spots are distinct and round. These cats are very smart; they can figure out how to open doors and drawers and even create their own games like “go fetch”! They are very devoted to their owners and possess an endless supply of energy.

The first Savannah cat was created accidentally when Judee Frank’s Siamese queen and a male Serval that Frank was keeping an eye on for another breeder crossed. Miracle, the kitten’s original name when it was born in 1986, was changed to “Savannah” shortly after. After the Savannah was accepted by the Canadian Cat Association in 2006, the breed quickly became well-known and well-liked all over the world. In May 2012, The International Cat Association granted Savannah cats Championship status, allowing them to compete against other breeds and growing in popularity.

Savannah Cat Breed

The tall, lean frame of the Savannah cat makes them appear larger than they actually are. Sexe and generation have a significant impact on size, with F1 hybrid (filial 1 hybrid) male cats typically being the largest. Depending on the generation, early-generation Savannahs can reach heights of 17 inches and weights of 25 pounds, with the F1 or F2 neutered males typically gaining the most weight due primarily to genetics. Weights of later-generation Savannahs typically range from 5.5 to 17.6 lbs. The size of Savannahs can vary greatly, even within a single litter, as a result of random genetic factors. She matures completely and reaches adult size in about 3 years. These cats typically live between 12 and 15 years, but there are numerous reports of them surviving well past 20.

The Savannah cat’s distinct combination of exotic appearance and playful personality makes it an intriguing and enigmatic creature. Savannah cats, which were bred to look noble and regal, resemble a cheetah in the wild. Although it’s difficult to imagine a cat willingly wading into the water, Savannahs don’t mind swimming. Savannah cats are amenable to leash training. The satisfaction of taking your cat for a stroll through the park is well worth the practice and patience required for this.

 

Savannah Cat Breed Maintenance

Savannah cats’ dietary needs are the same as those of domestic cats. Some experts advise combining commercial wet or dry food with either raw or cooked meat. Some experts might suggest a taurine supplement because they believe the breed needs more taurine. Others contend that since the animal’s wild ancestors consumed a diet high in whole proteins, dry food should not contain any grains or corn. Make sure your cat has access to clean, fresh water. If you plan to adopt a kitten, talk to your breeder and your vet about the cat’s diet. As a cat ages, its needs will change, so you need to watch out that your cat doesn’t gain too much weight.

Savannah cats are excellent at maintaining their short coats in top condition, but they do benefit from weekly brushing sessions. Grooming your Savannah cat is a great way to get rid of extra hair before it gets on your furniture and helps to strengthen the bond between you and your cat. Short-haired cats benefit from grooming because it reduces hairballs as well. Given the size and energy of Savannah cats, it is a very good idea to teach them to accept nail trimmings from an early age. These large, stunning cats will be much less likely to accidentally scratch you or damage your possessions because their claws don’t have sharp tips. For many cats, periodontal disease is a problem. For this reason, you might want to teach your cat how to brush their teeth with a brush that is specially shaped for cats and cat toothpaste that your feline friend will like.

Savannah Kittens

Savannah cats have been compared to dogs because they enjoy playing fetch and can be trained. They can be trained to perform tricks and follow instructions using a clicker just like a dog. Savannah cats are extremely sharp. Try teaching them how to fetch, come, sit, spin, and shake to keep their minds active. When training your Savannah cat, use a clicker for the best results. Teach only one trick at a time to your cat during 10- to 15-minute sessions.

Pedigreed and mixed-breed cats both have varying rates of health issues that could be genetic in origin. However, the Savannah is generally in good health and has no known genetic issues. Some Savannahs’ cosmetic flaws may keep them out of the show ring, but they have no impact on his health or his capacity to be a wonderful companion. Consider good cat insurance plans to make sure your Savannah cat is covered in the event of an emergency.

 

Bottom Line

Savannah cats are intelligent, incredibly active cats that need a lot of playtime, interaction, and exercise. Exercise caution if you have other small pets, such as rodents, birds, or fish, in the house because they have strong hunting instincts.

The height of a Savannah cat makes it possible for them to perform incredible jumps that can reach up to 8 feet in the air! Savannah cats have a reputation for hanging out in high places and jumping onto refrigerators, cabinets, doors, and just about anything else they can find.

Aim to interact with a Savannah cat frequently if you want to live happily with her. Make sure she has engaging toys to keep her occupied when you aren’t around. Reward her for actions you approve of, and refocus her attention and interests when she carries out actions you disapprove of. Put special possessions out of reach to protect them. Pick a different cat if all of this sounds like too much work.

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